Mold Inspection and Testing

ct mold testing front

Mold Inspection and Testing

 

ECOthink group (ETG) specializes in identifying, evaluating and controlling mold hazards in residential and commercial buildings.   Our experts consist of Certified Industrial Hygienists (CIHs), safety and mold professionals with over 20 years experience in the field of mold inspection and testing.   We provide a wide range of services that focus on solving your mold issues including toxic black mold also known as stachybotrys chartaram.  Mold contamination is a serious issue that can detrimentally effect your health and significantly damage your property.

 

Mold contamination results from moisture intrusion.  The first step in controlling the mold hazards is to eliminate the source of moisture.  ETG can assist you in detecting leaks and moisture intrusion through inspections using highly sensitive testing equipment and our extensive field experience.  We will provide feasible and effective solutions in a timely manner.

We work within the state of Connecticut and will respond expeditiously to your emergencies and requests.

 

The Connecticut Department of Health has issued mold removal guidelines titled “Connecticut Guidelines for Mold Abatement Contractors”.   These are recommended practices and not regulations.  The Connecticut guidelines for mold removal reference mold guidelines written by the New York  City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Health Canada, and the Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC).

 

The CT DPH recommends that at a minimum, all  mold abatement contractors working in Connecticut follow the principles and practices prescribed in the most current version of IICRC S520.  The CT DPH also recommend that every mold abatement job site have a full-time supervisor at the jobsite who is formally trained to understand the principles and practices described in IICRC S520.  In addition all workers should be adequately trained to understand the proper use of personal protective equipment (PPE), know how and when to use such equipment, and can work in a safe manner without causing harm to themselves, fellow workers and building occupants, or the building.

 

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) in its 2004 report Damp Indoor Spaces and Health,  concluded the following:

  • Indoor dampness can lead to the growth of bacteria and molds.  Dust mites can also thrive in damp indoor environments.   Standing water can lead to cockroach and rodent problems as well.  On going moisture issues can cause damage to building materials and furnishings leading to the release of toxic chemicals.
  • Mold spores are ubiquitous in the environment and are found in indoor air and on surfaces and materials.
  • Damp indoor environments can be conducive to the growth of bacteria that can cause negative health effects.
  • Minimizing moisture is imperative in controlling indoor mold growth.

 

The IOM reviewed pertinent studies and determined that potential health effects of exposure to either damp indoor environments or to mold indoors could be classified in one of three ways: 1) “sufficient evidence of an association” between the exposure and the health effect, 2) “limited or suggestive evidence” of an association, or 3) “inadequate or insufficient information” to determine if an association exists. The following tables summarize these findings.

 

Table 1. Review of evidence supporting an association between exposure to damp indoor environments and certain health effects.

Sufficient evidence Limited or suggestive evidence Inadequate or insufficient information
·      upper respiratory tract (nasal and throat) symptoms

·      cough

·      wheeze

·      asthma symptoms in sensitized asthmatic persons

·    shortness of breath

·    respiratory illness in otherwise healthy children

·    development of asthma in susceptible persons

a variety of other health outcomes, including acute idiopathic pulmonary hemorrhage in infants

 

 

Table 2. Review of evidence supporting an association between the presence of mold (otherwise unspecified) indoors and certain health effects.

Sufficient evidence Limited or suggestive evidence Inadequate or insufficient information
·      upper respiratory symptoms

·      cough

·      wheeze

·      asthma symptoms in sensitized asthmatic persons

·      hypersensitivity pneumonitis (a relatively rare immune-mediated condition) in susceptible persons

respiratory illness in otherwise healthy children

 

a variety of other health outcomes, including acute idiopathic pulmonary hemorrhage in infants

 

 

ETG services  include the following:

  • Mold investigations / mold inspections
  • Air testing for mold
  • Flood response services
  • Moisture assessments
  • Testing for sewage contaminants
  • Development of remediation specifications
  • Remediation services
  • Monitoring mold remediation
  • Clearance testing

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